Music and inspiration: double your works

I’m used to listen to music while working, I’m quite eclectic so every kind of music could suite.
When composing a render in Poser I generally listen to jazz: Charlie Parker and Miles Davis and Bill Evans and Herbie Hancock over all (you can see my last.fm profile), to adjust senses and relax while choosing the right geometries.

Drawing and retouching in Photoshop requires a more brilliant music, so my inspirations in colors goes with Slipknot, Stone Sour or Umkulu or some classic pop or hard rock song.
Astor Piazzolla is one of my fave even during works in Illustrator.

But for some complicated or hard work I tend to listen to Zen music, that kind of relaxing one that scents of Orient.

Zen Garden

Zen Garden is definitely my fave, and I have to thank Sir Alek for that; I found this kind of music is the best friend for a night of work and for a day of meditation.
Even for Tai-Chi practicing in the morning.

It’s said that human brain is multitasking (true, we all know) and that if feeded with good music, can be more productive; endorphines also are able to relax the physical body and works can be more attractive than usual.

Can it be?
Well, I want to report this exrtact from “Music and the Brain” by Lawrence O’Donnell:

Music’s interconnection with society can be seen throughout history. Every known culture on the earth has music. Music seems to be one of the basic actions of humans. However, early music was not handed down from generation to generation or recorded. Hence, there is no official record of “prehistoric” music. Even so, there is evidence of prehistoric music from the findings of flutes carved from bones.

The influence of music on society can be clearly seen from modern history. Music helped Thomas Jefferson write the Declaration of Independence. When he could not figure out the right wording for a certain part, he would play his violin to help him. The music helped him get the words from his brain onto the paper.

Albert Einstein is recognized as one of the smartest men who has ever lived. A little known fact about Einstein is that when he was young he did extremely poor in school. His grade school teachers told his parents to take him out of school because he was “too stupid to learn” and it would be a waste of resources for the school to invest time and energy in his education. The school suggested that his parents get Albert an easy, manual labor job as soon as they could. His mother did not think that Albert was “stupid”. Instead of following the school’s advice, Albert’s parents bought him a violin. Albert became good at the violin. Music was the key that helped Albert Einstein become one of the smartest men who has ever lived. Einstein himself says that the reason he was so smart is because he played the violin. He loved the music of Mozart and Bach the most. A friend of Einstein, G.J. Withrow, said that the way Einstein figured out his problems and equations was by improvising on the violin.

Music has a big influence on body, as said, and people perceive and respond to music in different ways. The level of musicianship of the performer and the listener as well as the manner in which a piece is performed affects the “experience” of music. An experienced and accomplished musician might hear and feel a piece of music in a totally different way than a non-musician or beginner.
This is why two accounts of the same piece of music can contradict themselves.

Let’s learn more:

In general, responses to music are able to be observed. It has been proven that music influences humans both in good and bad ways. These effects are instant and long lasting. Music is thought to link all of the emotional, spiritual, and physical elements of the universe. Music can also be used to change a person’s mood, and has been found to cause like physical responses in many people simultaneously. Music also has the ability to strengthen or weaken emotions from a particular event such as a funeral.

Rhythm is also an important aspect of music to study when looking at responses to music. There are two responses to rhythm. These responses are hard to separate because they are related, and one of these responses cannot exist without the other. These responses are (1) the actual hearing of the rhythm and (2) the physical response to the rhythm. Rhythm organizes physical movements and is very much related to the human body. For example, the body contains rhythms in the heartbeat, while walking, during breathing, etc. Another example of how rhythm orders movement is an autistic boy who could not tie his shoes. He learned how on the second try when the task of tying his shoes was put to a song. The rhythm helped organize his physical movements in time.

It cannot be proven that two people can feel the exact same thing from hearing a piece of music. For example, early missionaries to Africa thought that the nationals had bad rhythm. The missionaries said that when the nationals played on their drums it sounded like they were not beating in time. However, it was later discovered that the nationals were beating out complex polyrhythmic beats such as 2 against 3, 3 against 4, and 2 against 3 and 5, etc. These beats were too advanced for the missionaries to follow.

Responses to music are easy to be detected in the human body. Classical music from the baroque period causes the heart beat and pulse rate to relax to the beat of the music. As the body becomes relaxed and alert, the mind is able to concentrate more easily. Furthermore, baroque music decreases blood pressure and enhances the ability to learn. Music affects the amplitude and frequency of brain waves, which can be measured by an electro-encephalogram. Music also affects breathing rate and electrical resistance of the skin. It has been observed to cause the pupils to dilate, increase blood pressure, and increase the heart rate.

So.. try to find your right combination for music ad brain, you’ll be surprised of the final results!

full-stack graphic designer | social media manager | blogger, autrice e saggista | appassionata di Giappone, poker e pianoforte | mai senza occhiali da sole | attaccabrighe per natura